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Given the rapid increase in childhood myopia being seen in the U.S., the American Academy of Ophthalmology and American Academy of Pediatrics recently updated their guidance on managing myopia in children.


Most parents are aware of the many benefits associated with children taking part in outdoor activities. The obvious benefits of fresh air and physical exercise aren’t the only perks for kids who play outdoors. Recent research shows that increased “sun time” can actually slow down the progression of myopia (often referred to as nearsightedness), or even postpone its onset!  


Do you often wear prescription eyewear? If so, you must have imagined how easier life would've been if you no longer depended on eyeglasses or contact lenses. You want to correct your vision problems without eye surgery. The good news is this idea only sounded far-fetched in the past. But it's an option for many people these days. Thanks to orthokeratology or ortho-k, it's now possible to correct refractive errors and slow the progression of nearsightedness in children. But who could be a good candidate for this treatment? Your eye doctor may recommend ortho-k if you have the following vision problems:


When it comes to eye care, you are advised to wear sunglasses to protect yourself from damaging UV rays. Today, most sunglasses are embedded with UV protection lenses. To be sure that your sunglasses have UV protection, you can take them to an optical shop for testing.


The drastic increase in the number of children diagnosed with myopia during the past decade is astonishing — but is it surprising? Not really. When you analyze the causes of myopia, it becomes clear why more and more children are becoming affected by this progressive eye disease.  


Unless you have worn contact lenses before, you may not realize that there are lots of different styles and materials to choose from. Since every patient and eye is unique, there’s no ‘one-lens-fits-all’ solution, and instead, it’s important to select the variety that best suits your eyes and your visual needs. One type of contact lens that you may not be familiar with is the scleral lenses.


As time goes on, chances are you probably know someone who has myopia - whether your child, a friend, family member or yourself. But how much do you really know about this eye disease? Some parents expect that simply receiving a pair of glasses for their child is the only way of dealing with the effects of myopia. In truth, there’s much more to myopia and what you can do about it than meets the eye.  


Myopia is a very common eye condition that causes distant objects to appear blurred, while those closer by are easy to see without the help of visual aids. It occurs when light that is around us isn’t processed properly by the eyes, causing the messages our brain receives from them to be garbled and our vision appears to be blurred. It’s not only adults that are affected either. Childhood myopia rates are drastically increasing, and it is now estimated that as many as a third of children are now affected by myopia to some extent. This is thought to be partly due to the ‘screen culture’ that captivates young people today, and not spending enough time outdoors and getting natural vitamin D directly from its main source – the sun.


Many parents who come into our practices consider their children’s myopia as a simple vision problem that needs correction. Each time the child needs a higher prescription, they just “fix” it by buying them a new pair of glasses.


Myopia is a vision condition that makes distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness. It mainly affects children, but even adults can have it.


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